Classics courses and programs | Mount Allison

Degree programs, minors, majors

Disciplinary BA program

Minor in classical studies

MINOR in classical studies is 24 credits earned as follows:

  • 18 from Classics, Latin, or Greek; or PHIL 1601
  • 6 from Classics, Latin, or Greek at the 3/4000 level

Students may choose a minor program with an emphasis on ancient history, classical literature, or art and archaeology.

Minor in Greek

MINOR in Greek is 24 credits earned as follows:

  • 18 from GREK 1001, 1101, 2001, 2101, and Greek at the 3000 level
  • 6 from Greek, Latin, or Classics
Minor in Latin

MINOR in Latin is 24 credits earned as follows:

  • 18 from LATI 1001, 1101, 2001, 2101, and Latin at the 3000 level
  • 6 from Greek, Latin, or Classics
Major in classical studies

MAJOR in classical studies is 60 credits earned as follows:

  • 6 from LATI 1001, 1101, GREK 1001, 1101 3
  • 6 from Classics, Greek, Latin, of which 24 must be from the 3/4000 level
  • 18 from complementary courses in Arts and Letters and Humanities (or others), chosen in consultation with the program advisor
Honours in classical studies

HONOURS in classical studies is 72 credits earned as follows:

  • 12 from LATI 1001, 1101, GREK 1001, 1101
  • 6 from LATI 2001, 2101, GREK 2001, 2101
  • 6 from Greek/Latin at the 3000/4000 level OR CLAS 4950/4951
  • 48 from Classics/Greek/Latin, of which 33 must be at the 3/4000 level

Courses

The following courses are being offered this year. For a full listing of classics courses, please consult the Academic Calendar.

Announcing our Spring/Summer Courses!

CLAS 2521 - The Archaeology of Daily Life in the Greek and Roman World

What was a Greek and Roman’s daily life like? What did a Greek or Roman man or woman do? What did she or he wear? Where did she or he live? What did she or he eat? This course will explore the everyday life of people in ancient Greece and Rome through archaeological sources. Topics to be covered will include town planning, housing, family, education, clothing, food and drink, religion, leisure and sport activities. Unscheduled online. Email ibatilloro@mta.ca for details.

CLAS 2501 - Introduction to Archaeology

Archaeology is the discipline whose principal aim is the study of past cultures and societies through the analysis of material remains. It represents our only access to the 3 million years of human lifeways before writing was invented, and it is also our only source of information to the lives of those people often overlooked or misrepresented in written history, such as slaves, peasants, and women. This course explores archaeological theories, methods, and concepts, by illustrating worldwide case-studies from both the Old and the New World. Unscheduled online. Email ibatilloro@mta.ca for details.

2021–22 courses

Fall 2021

CLAS 1631:  Greece & Rome: The Foundations of Western Civilization
Instructor:
B. Robertson
The political and social history of ancient Greece and Rome will be surveyed with a focus on the themes of Law, Politics, War, and Society. Special attention will be paid to Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C.E. and to Rome under Caesar Augustus. (3 credits) [Note: This course is cross-listed with HIST 1631 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

CLAS 2051: Women in Antiquity
Instructor:
C. Tran
Using written and material evidence, this course will explore the economic, social and political roles of women in the societies of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as the development of the Western idea of the female in antiquity. Secondarily, it will introduce and explore the social theories commonly applied to the study of gender in history. (3 credits) [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 2051 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

CLAS 2411:  Hero’s Quest: Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Instructor:
C. Forstall
This course presents the canonical works of the Greek and Roman Epic traditions: the Trojan war and the rage of Achilles, the wanderings of Odysseus, Jason's quest for the Golden Fleece, and Aeneas' search for a Roman homeland. Students read the original authors in English translation: Homer, Virgil, and Apollonius of Rhodes. The course also introduces key analytical skills necessary for research in the humanities, with a special focus on critical close reading, effective argumentation, and citation of primary sources. (3 credits) (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

CLAS 2501:  Introduction to Archaeology
Instructor
:  H. Cary
An introduction to the methods of archaeological excavation. This course aims to acquaint the student with the theory and basic techniques of archaeology. Examples showing both past and present archaeological research done in the Old and New Worlds will be used to illustrate the topics under discussion. (3 credits) (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

CLAS 3021: Conquest and Expansion: the Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic
Instructor:
B. Robertson
An examination of the development of Rome from a small city-state into the leading power in the Mediterranean. Main themes include the conflict between Rome and Carthage, the conquest of the Hellenistic East, and the political and social changes in Roman society. There will be an emphasis on the analysis and interpretation of primary sources in translation. (3 credits) [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 3021 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)
Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department

CLAS 3731: Art and Archaeology of Pompeii
Instructor:
E. Godfrey
This course closely examines the archaeological remains from the city of Pompeii in the Bay of Naples: its road system, sewers, public markets, cult places, burial monuments, brothels, bathhouses, political buildings, and houses and residential areas. It pays special attention to the occupation phases of the city before the foundation of the Roman colony in 80 BC, and the impact that the Roman conquest of Pompeii had on its architectural and artistic forms. It also explores the 'hidden history' of Pompeii as a means to raise awareness about the role of material culture in giving voice to cultures and communities that have not left written sources to us. [Note 1: This course may count as 3 credits in Art History. Note 2: This course is cross-listed with VMCS 3721 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)
Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, FINH, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department

CLAS 3991: Special Topics: Roman Horror
Instructor:
C. Forstall
The goal of this course is to become familiar with the epic (and tragic) poetry of post-Augustan Rome and with its primary authors, themes, and stylistic preoccupations. A second, related goal is to hone the practice of critical reading and literary analysis in order to better understand the literary arts of our own time, especially in light of their Classical heritage. (3 credits)

GREK 2001: Intermediate Greek
Instructor:
C. Forstall
This course introduces students to the reading of unadapted passages from ancient authors. While the emphasis is on developing a fluency in reading Greek, it also reviews basic Greek grammar and presents some more advanced grammar and syntax. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)
Prereq: GREK 1101; or permission of the Department

GREK 4001: Directed Readings in Greek
Instructor:
C. Forstall
This course is a detailed study of one or more Greek authors. [Note 1: Permission of the Department required. Note 2: GREK 4001 may be taken for credit more than once if the topic differs.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

LATI 1001: Introductory Latin I
Instructor
:  E. Godfrey
Exclusion:  LATI 1000
An introduction to basic Latin grammar and vocabulary for students with no previous knowledge of the language. This course is based on readings which present not only the fundamentals of Latin but also the Roman world in which it was used. Some effort is made to show the connections between Latin and modern languages (English, French, Spanish). Three class periods per week, plus a fourth hour to be arranged after classes have begun. (3 credits) (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour)

LATI 2001: Intermediate Latin (3 credits)
Instructor
: B. Robertson
This course introduces students to the reading of unadapted passages from ancient authors. While the emphasis is on developing a fluency in reading Latin, it also reviews basic Latin grammar and presents some more advanced grammar and syntax. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)
Prereq: LATI 1101; or permission of the Department.

LATI 3101: Readings in Latin Poetry
Instructor:
C. Forstall
The translation and study of the work of one or more Latin poets. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)
Prereq: LATI 2101; or permission of the Department

Winter 2022

CLAS 1651:  Classic Mythology: Gods, Goddesses, and the Creation of Order
Instructor
: C. Forstall
An introduction to the gods and goddesses of classical myth in the literature, art, and religion of ancient Greece and Rome. The course will examine cosmogonies and divine myths in order to shed light on the views held by the Greeks and Romans about the nature of the relationship between mortal and immortal.
(3 credits)(Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

CLAS 2021:  Alexander the Great
Instructor
:  B. Robertson
Exclusion: CLAS/HIST 3011
An examination of the career of Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic era that followed his conquest of the eastern Mediterranean. Among the main themes included will the goals of Alexander, the new political climate of kingship and patronage that he helped create, the interaction of the Greeks with the civilizations of Egypt and the East, and the integration of new cultural ideas into Greek society. (3 credits) (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) [Note: This course is cross-listed with HIST 2021 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.]

CLAS 2521: The Archaeology of Daily Life in the Greek and Roman World
Instructor
:  I. Battiloro
An examination of the evidence used by archaeologists to recreate the social history of ancient Greece and Rome. The course will consider how archaeology can shed light on such topics as the lives of men, women, and children; the home; government; the economy; the army; and entertainment. (3 credits)  (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

CLAS 3031: The Roman Empire: Centre and Periphery
Instructor:
B. Robertson
An examination of the history of imperial Rome from the age of Augustus to that of Constantine. Main themes include the imperial form of government, the Roman army, urban development and its impact on society, and the conflicts between Romans and other cultures. There will be an emphasis on the analysis and interpretation of primary sources in translation. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 3031 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (3 credits)
Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department

CLAS 3401: The Lyric Poetry of Greece and Rome
Instructor:
C. Forstall
A study of Greek and Roman poetry that expresses universal feelings of love and fear, celebration and personal aspiration. The course will examine the themes and forms of lyric poetry, as well as the role of the poet in society. The poems of Sappho, Archilochus, Pindar, Catullus, Propertius, Ovid, and others will be read in English translation. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (3 credits)
Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department

CLAS 3721: Art and Archaeology of Pompeii
Instructor:
I. Battiloro
This course closely examines the archaeological remains from the city of Pompeii in the Bay of Naples: its road system, sewers, public markets, cult places, burial monuments, brothels, bathhouses, political buildings, and houses and residential areas. It pays special attention to the occupation phases of the city before the foundation of the Roman colony in 80 BC, and the impact that the Roman conquest of Pompeii had on its architectural and artistic forms. It also explores the 'hidden history' of Pompeii as a means to raise awareness about the role of material culture in giving voice to cultures and communities that have not left written sources to us. [Note 1: This course may count as 3 credits in Art History. Note 2: This course is cross-listed with VMCS 3721 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (3 credits)
Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, FINH, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department.

CLAS 3801: Digital Methods in the Humanities
Instructor:
C. Forstall
This course introduces the tools and methods of Digital Humanities research. It surveys recent computational work in a variety of humanities disciplines, focusing critical attention on the particular modes of thought, biases, strengths, and limitations that characterize the Digital Humanities. The course simultaneously provides hands-on instruction in basic practices for digital research. It assumes no prior computing expertise but does expect that students have some experience with research in their own field. (Format: integrated lecture and laboratory, 3 Hours) (Exclusion: CLAS 3991- Digital Methods in the Humanities) (3 credits)
Prereq: Second-year standing, any second-year course in Arts

GREK 2101: Introductory Readings in Greek Literature
Instructor:
C. Forstall
A reading of selected works by Greek authors. This course will acquaint the student with some of the forms of ancient prose and poetry. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (3 credits)
Prereq: GREK 2001; or permission of the Department.

GREK 3001: Readings in Greek Prose
Instructor:
B. Robertson
The translation and study of the work of one or more Greek prose authors. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (3 credits)
Prereq: GREK 2101; or permission of the Department.

LATI 1101: Introductory Latin II
Instructor:
C. Tran
Exclusion: LATI 1000
A continuation of the study of the Latin language. While adding new grammar, this course concentrates on reading comprehension and vocabulary building. Three class periods per week, plus a fourth hour to be arranged after classes have begun. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour) (3 credits)
Prereq: LATI 1001; or permission of the Department.

LATI 2101: Introductory Readings in Latin Literature 
Instructor
: I. Battiloro
A reading of selected works by Latin authors. This course will acquaint the student with some of the forms of ancient prose and poetry. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (3 credits)
Prereq: LATI 2001; or permission of the Department.

LATI 3001: Readings in Latin Prose
Instructor
: B. Robertson
Prereq: LATI 2101; or permission of the Department
The translation and study of the work of one or more Latin prose authors. (3 credits) (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)