Political science and international relations courses and programs | Mount Allison

Courses

For a complete listing of the courses offered by the Department see the Academic Calendar.

For a listing of courses offered this year, see the timetable.


Programs

Four different programs are offered through the Department.

Political Science

The Political Science program is designed for students who are interested in the study of politics.

The study of politics is concerned with:

  • the nature and workings of power, state, and government
  • the rights and duties of citizenship
  • the limits and possibilities of collective political action
  • the social, economic, and cultural formations that shape the life of the political community

The scope of inquiry is local, national, and international; it includes the empirical analysis of individuals, groups, institutions and processes as well as the investigation of longstanding philosophical questions concerning human nature, freedom, democracy, and justice.

The Department offers an honours, major, or minor Bachelor of Arts (BA) program. A minor in political science can also be taken with a Bachelor of Science.

The political science program is organized into four main subfields:

  • Canadian politics
  • comparative politics
  • international politics
  • political theory 

The program offers students the opportunity to gain a strong foundation in all four subfields and to combine empirical, practical, and theoretical approaches in each year of study.

In addition to the Canadian politics subfield, students can take specialized area courses in Africa, the United States, Europe, and the Middle East.

Political science students who seek a more intensive concentration in one particular subfield can integrate courses from other programs in Canadian studies, international relations, history, and philosophy.

For the courses required for each program and their prerequisites see the Academic Calendar.

International Relations

The international relations (IR) BA program is designed for students who are interested in an inter-disciplinary approach to international and global studies.

International and global studies are concerned with:

  • the interconnections between state as well as non-state organizations and actors
  • the globalizing effects of economic, social, technological, environmental, military, and political processes
  • emerging issues of justice, responsibility, and human well-being that are international and global in scope

IR operates as an inter- and multi-disciplinary degree program in which core, as well as elective courses, are drawn from a range of disciplines such as political science, history, modern languages and literatures, sociology, anthropology, economics, geography, and environmental studies.

The program provides students with a broad range of intellectual and critical skills for analyzing the interactions between political and economic systems, cultural norms, environmental dynamics, and hierarchies of power.

A university-level language requirement anchors the program. To supplement their coursework, students are encouraged to gain international experience by studying or working abroad or by doing international work in Canada.

The Department offers an honours or major Bachelor of Arts (BA) program in IR. A minor in international politics is also offered.

For the courses required for each program and their prerequisites see the Academic Calendar.

Canadian Public Policy

The Canadian Public Policy program at Mount Allison provides an adaptable and broad knowledge base for students interested in all levels of Canadian-based policy work, giving students a strong foundation in policy analysis and implementation.

Students take a core set of political science and economics courses from the foundation of the CPP program, then select areas of specialization to complete their degree.

Topics of study include:

  • theories and processes of public policy-making
  • analysis of public policy fields like environment, health, and education
  • political leadership in Canada
  • Canadian federalism and intergovernmental relations
  • social and legal issues and policies in regional, national, and international contexts
  • organizational behaviour, financial and management accounting

Find a list of Canadian Public Policy courses in the Academic Calendar.

Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

Today’s graduates need to be adaptable — able to learn new skills, to look at an issue from different points of view, to be independent thinkers who are not afraid to tackle a challenge.

The Philosophy, Politics, and Economics program helps students develop critical thinking skills that will serve them well no matter their chosen career.

This multidisciplinary program gives students the opportunity to look at the world through three distinct disciplines and begin to recognize how each of these aspects of society work with and against each other.

It cultivates a deeper and more meaningful understanding of how and why the world works as it does, equipping students with better tools to be able to improve the human condition.

Explore the PPE program.


Academic advising

Political Science

Dr. Wayne Hunt
whunt@mta.ca

Canadian Public Policy (CPP)

Dr. Mario Levesque
malevesque@mta.ca

International Relations

Dr. James Devine
jtdevine@mta.ca

Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE)

(Politics stream only)

Dr. Mario Levesque
malevesque@mta.ca

Useful links


Program planning

Political Science

First and second year

  • Take POLS 1001 Foundations of Politics, and 6 credits in POLS courses at the 2000 level.
  • In addition, you should be thinking about a possible minor area of study and taking prerequisites for the upper level courses in that area.
  • Bachelor of Arts students must complete at least 6 credits in each of the four distribution areas, and are advised to do so during their first two years of study. Some of these requirements may be filled by completing the politics degree requirements.
  • You need to declare your major and minor by the end of second year.

Third and fourth year

  • If you are completing a major in political science you will require 3 credits at the third or fourth year in each of the four subfields (theory, Canadian, comparative, international politics); if you are completing an honours you will require 6 credits in each of these fields. You should plan to complete at least 3 credits in each subfield by the end of third year.
  • Complete all remaining credits in political science for your major.
  • Complete all remaining credits for your chosen minor.
  • If you intend to graduate in May you must complete an application for graduation by Sept. 30 and a degree audit form by Oct. 30.

Honours

You must declare you intention to complete an honours degree by December of third year. This can be done by completing the declaration to pursue honours form.

Eligibility to complete an honours program will depend on your academic performance at the end of third year. See the Academic Calendar, section10.10.4, for honours GPA and overall GPA requirements.

Students completing an honours degree are not required to complete a minor.

Degree audit forms

To keep track of the courses you have taken, it is useful to fill in a degree audit form.

International Relations

First and second year

  • Take POLS 1001 Foundations of Politics, and POLS/INLR 2301 Introduction to International Relations.
  • Take 3 more credits in political science, POLS at the 2000 level.
  • Take economics, ECON 1001 and 1011 (Principles of Microeconomics and Macroeconomics).
  • Take 12 credits in the same language.
  • You should be thinking about which areas you would like to take as elective streams in your degree and taking courses in these areas. In the first two years you need to be building prerequisites for the 3000 and 4000 level courses in each of the two streams. Choose two from: economics, English, geography, environment, history, political science, religious studies, or sociology.
  • In addition, you should be thinking about a possible minor area of study, and taking prerequisites for the upper level courses in that area. Your minor may end up being the same as one of your optional streams.
  • Bachelor of Arts students must complete at least 6 credits in each of the four distribution areas, and are advised to do so during their first two years of study. Some of these requirements may be filled by completing the IR degree requirements.
  • International exchanges normally occur in third year, so you will need to apply for exchanges during the second year. You should speak to an academic advisor before applying for any exchange programs.
  • You need to declare your major and minor by the end of second year.

Third and fourth year

  • Take 3 credits from politics, the POLS 3300 series.
  • Take 3 credits from the following economics courses: 3301, 3501, 3801, 3901, 3921, 4531, 4551.
  • Take 9 credits in international relations, INLR at the 3000 or 4000 level.
  • Complete 9 credits in each of the two elective streams you have chosen — 18 credits in total (economics, English, geography, environment, history, political science, religious studies, or sociology).
  • Complete all remaining credits for your chosen minor.

If you intend to graduate in May you must complete an application for graduation by Sept. 30 of the year you intend to graduate and a degree audit form by Oct. 30.

Honours

If you are pursuing an honours degree, consult with a program advisor regarding course selection for completing 4000 level courses required for the program.

You must declare you intention to complete an honours degree by December of third year. This can be done by completing the declaration to pursue honours form.

Eligibility to complete an honours program will depend on your academic performance at the end of third year. See the Academic Calendar, section 10.10.4 for honours GPA and overall GPA requirements.

Students completing an honours degree are not required to complete a minor.

Degree audit form

To keep track of the courses you have taken, it is useful to fill in degree audit form.